The Latest:

Corporate Art Collections

By Karen Atkinson, courtesy of Side Street Projects

The information below is part of a series of guides that outline the pros and cons of various types of venues.


ABOUT: These range from Fortune 500 corporations, to hospitals, to local restaurants. Art is purchased for investment, office furnishing, prestige, and employee morale. Some corporations have in-house curators on staff.

Rental Galleries

By Karen Atkinson, courtesy of Side Street Projects

The information below is part of a series of guides that outline the pros and cons of various types of venues.


ABOUT:  Rental Galleries are often associated with museums.  They show the work of artists and rent the work by the month or year.

EXPECTATIONS:  Generally work with a wide range of artists.

PROS:  Can be a good way to generate income from your work.

CONS:  Many of these works are hung in private places, so are not open to viewing by the public.

Private Art Dealers and Art Consultants

By Karen Atkinson, courtesy of Side Street Projects

The information below is part of a series of guides that outline the pros and cons of various types of venues.


ABOUT:  Many work from their home or a small office.  Most do not do public exhibitions.  Some work with a specific genre or media, others choose artists by project.  Some make their money from the sale of an artist’s work, and others don’t.

College and University Galleries

By Karen Atkinson, courtesy of Side Street Projects

The information below is part of a series of guides that outline the pros and cons of various types of venues.

ABOUT: Many have galleries supported by the institution. Many are open to proposals from the field. Often have a built-in audience of students and faculty.

EXPECTATIONS: Many of these spaces function like museums or nonprofit spaces. Contact them to find out submission guidelines.

Nonprofit and Artist-Run Spaces

By Karen Atkinson, courtesy of Side Street Projects

The information below is part of a series of guides that outline the pros and cons of various types of venues.

ABOUT: Traditionally called alternative spaces, these organizations began in the 1970s to expand the exhibition of artists’ work. These exhibition spaces are supported through public and private funding. They often have many opportunities for artists and do educational programming as well.

Commercial Galleries

By Karen Atkinson, courtesy of Side Street Projects

The information below is part of a series of guides that outline the pros and cons of various types of venues.

ABOUT:  These are for-profit businesses that select artists either by open call or private selection.  The dealers make their money from the sales of the artwork.  The commission the dealer takes from the sale of this work can range from 40 – 90%.  Most sales should be about 50% to the dealer and 50% to the artist.

Guidelines for Exhibiting in Museums

By Karen Atkinson, courtesy of Side Street Projects

The information below is part of a series of guides that outline the pros and cons of various types of venues.


ABOUT: Museums offer one person, group, thematic, invitational and juried exhibitions. Most do not accept proposals for review, but some do. Most have their own curatorial staffs who do the invitations to show, or organize their own exhibitions.

Alternative venues

By Karen Atkinson, courtesy of Side Street Projects

The information below is part of a series of guides that outline the pros and cons of various types of venues.


ABOUT: These are exhibition sites that don’t fit into any of the rest of the categories here. They include banks, bookstores and other commercial venues, corporate and city government lobbies, restaurants, schools etc. A list is included below under resources.

EXPECTATIONS: Work is hung in a public space. Often the responsibilities for labor and expenses fall onto the artist.

sven lennartz

The Skinny on Online Galleries

By Ilana Stanger, courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

You want to sell your work online. Why not, a sale is a sale, right? But the world of online galleries can be complicated to steer. We talked with the owners of some of the web's most respected sites — Paintings Direct.com, Next Monet.com, Solid Expressions.com, and the Guild.com — and asked them what they would tell artists to look for before signing up for online representation. What follows is their advice, which, despite the fabled diversity of views on the internet, was surprisingly uniform.

Exhibition Checklist

By Karen Atkinson, courtesy of Side Street Projects

Once you have an exhibition venue, make sure you find out the answers to the following questions, and follow the suggested timeline below.  Choose the questions that are applicable to your project and the venue.

• Dates for the exhibition.

• Date and time of the opening reception.

• What is the honorarium or artist’s fee?

• What are the responsibilities of the venue or gallery?

• What are your responsibilities as the artist?

• Who is the main contact person for the venue?

Art Fairs and Festivals

By Karen Atkinson, courtesy of Side Street Projects

In Festivals, artists can sell work in a juried venue directly to the buyer. Table or display space is rented. Generally take place yearly and on a state or regional level. Art Fairs on the other hand are held for dealers and collectors, and often are international.

cvsteps.com

Setting Clear Goals

The First Step on the Runway to Success - By Geoffrey Gorman, courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

The carpeting is soft underfoot; the lights are dim except for those illuminating the paintings on the wall; the room hums with people crowding around the canvases, murmuring their approval and delight. You stand at the center of a group of admirers, glass of champagne in your hand, receiving praise and congratulations on your latest show. It's already an unprecedented success, which even on this opening night has brought you many thousands of dollars in terms of sales and dozens of requests for interviews in international art magazines.

Does it sound like a dream? It may be just a dream at this moment. But it can happen. However, before it does, you have to want it to happen. And that means setting goals.

Investing in Your Career — A Worthwhile Risk?

(courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts)

In order to succeed in your career some financial investment is usually necessary, and the career of the fine artist is no exception: art supplies are expensive, art schools can be astronomical, and finished works may have to be framed, crated, shipped, and insured. There are outlays for postcards, postage, portfolios, brochures, slides, and even perhaps a website. And then there's the question of vanity galleries.

New York Foundation for the Arts

The Benefits of Belonging

Making the most of art organizations like the College Art Association

The College Art Association (CAA) came into existence in 1911 as a professional organization for both art historians and artists, in particular those who teach at the college level. What are the benefits to artists of belonging to an organization like CAA?

I Wanted to Be an Artist, So I Quit My Job and Became One

By Christopher Fife, courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

"Hi, I'm Christopher. I'm an artist." Exhale, run my fingers through my hair. "What do I do? Oh, I paint. I'm a painter. Yeah, I'm an artist."

I tried it out every now and then, in front of the bathroom mirror. It sounded all right. But when I introduced myself as an artist outside my bathroom world of make-believe, I always felt false. I was like Magritte labeling a pipe. If I said I was an artist, I was an artist, right?

Preparing Your Art School Portfolio

By Karyn Tufarolo, Admissions Counselor, The University of the Arts, courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

You've scoured through the brochures, filled out the applications, wrote those navel-gazing essays about why you want to be an artist, but now the worst seems to loom over you. You have to present a portfolio of your work. It's difficult to trust your belief in your own art when you wonder "Am I good enough?" The key to your portfolio is to convey not only your skills, but also your potential to do more.

Dr. Art on Paying to Exhibit Your Work

by Matthew Deleget, courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

Each year the Hotline receives hundreds of calls from artists who are desperate to exhibit their work. They are sometimes willing to do literally anything, which includes paying huge sums of money. Vanity galleries, national competitions, and unscrupulous dealers profit handsomely from this desperation. For this issue, Dr. Art has invited author and artist advisor Renee Phillips of Manhattan Arts International to discuss her views on artists paying to exhibit their work.

Curators' Chat: Eungie Joo Speaks with Lauri Firstenberg and Franklin Sirmans

Courtesy of New York Foundation for the Arts

Eungie Joo: When NYFA Quarterly editor Alan Gilbert approached me to do a piece on independent curating, I thought we should have this conversation together, because we’re all doing related work and our practices appear to be linked—we often write about and work with the same artists, we’re all about the same age, and each of us is publishing a bit. But we each have very different emphases and starting points, and I want to talk a little about how we all began in this field.

Dr. Art on Buying a Home

by Matthew Deleget, New York Foundation for the Arts

Part 1: How Much Can You Afford?

How many artists reading this article own their own home? Personally, I don’t know very many. I can probably count them on one hand.

Pages